The Table Video

Ronald J. Sider

Thinking and Acting Biblically About Politics

Distinguished Professor of Theology, Holistic Ministry, and Public Policy, Palmer Theological Seminary
June 15, 2017

What biblical principles serve to ground Christian engagement in politics? How can Christian love and humility positively impact American political life?

Distinguished prof of theology, holistic ministry, and Public Policy at Palmer Theological Seminary and President Emeritus of Evangelicals for Social Action. A widely known evangelical speaker and writer, Sider has spoken on six continents, published more than thirty books and scores of articles. In 1982, The Christian Century named him one of the twelve “most influential persons in the field of religion in the U.S.” His Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger(6th ed., 2015) was recognized by Christianity Today as one of the one hundred most influential religious books of the twentieth century and named the seventh most influential book in the evangelical world in the last fifty years. His more recent books include I Am not a Social Activist, Fixing the Moral Deficit: A Balanced Way to Balance the Budget, Just Politics: A Guide for Christian Engagement, The Early Church on Killing: A Comprehensive Sourcebook on War, Abortion, and Capital Punishment and Nonviolent Action: What Christian Ethics Demands But Most Christians Have Never Really Tried. Among his other publications are: Good News and Good Works: A Theology for the Whole Gospel, The Scandal of the Evangelical Conscience: Why Are Christians Living Just Like the Rest of the World, Just Generosity: A New Vision for Overcoming Poverty in America and Churches That Make a Difference: Reaching Your Community with Good News and Good Works (with Phil Olson and Heidi Unruh). Sider was the publisher of PRISM magazine and a contributing editor of Christianity Today for twenty years. He is a contributing editor of Sojourners. He has lectured at scores of colleges and universities around the world, including Yale, Harvard, Princeton, and Oxford. In 2014, he received the William Sloane Coffin Award for Peace and Justice from Yale Divinity School.

About the Author