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Shortreads

Cultured to Disconnect: Recovering Our Ability to Love in the Midst of Social and Spiritual Fragmentation


Psychologist Todd Hall (Rosemead School of Psychology, CCT Research Fellow) writes on the power of secure human relationships to undo the sad truth that we're "Cultured to Disconnect." 

This essay is Todd's contribution to the #BarnaFrames 10th Frame Contest. Read his full essay and vote for Todd by clicking here.

We're cultured to disconnect—relationally and spiritually.

Over the past fifty years, we have witnessed the breakdown of the traditional family, in which children first learn how to connect to people, morality, and God. In addition, we have become less socially connected to friends and community groups as Boomers, GenX'ers, and Millennials have become more individualistic and materialistic, have less leisure time and more financial pressures, and consume more electronic entertainment in a more mindless way. Finally, declining social connectedness is causing a parallel decline in emotional well-being. Rates of depression, for example, have increased tenfold during this time, largely due to social isolation.

The fragmented social context in which we have grown up leaves many of us feeling not just relationally disconnected, but also spiritually disconnected. Why does this happen? The reason is that our early human relationships become gut-level filters that shape all future relationships, including our relationship with God. There are two critical implications of this.

READ MORE AND VOTE FOR TODD IN THE #BARNAFRAMES 10TH FRAME CONTEST.