The Meaning of Love Grant Recipients

Jun 1, 2015

We're pleased to announce the fellowship and grant recipients for our 2015-2016 year exploring The Meaning of Love.

Research Fellowships

Fall 2015 

  • Uche Anizor, Associate Professor of Theology, Talbot School of Theology
    "Love and the End of Creation"
  • Brett FosterAssociate Professor of English, Wheaton College
    "Love Poetry of the English Renaissance and Its Relationship to Contemporary Ideas of Love"
  • George Hunsinger, Hazel Thompson McCord Professor of Systematic Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary
    "After Nygren: Agape and Eros Reconsidered"
  • Klaus Issler, Professor of Christian Education & Theology, Talbot School of Theology
    "Love Your Neighbor As Yourself: Exploring a Christian Conception of Self-Care and Self-Interest (Rightly Understood)"
  • Ellen Ross, Professor of Religion, Swarthmore College
    "American Prophets and the Transforming Power of Love"
  • Eric Silverman, Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies, Christopher Newport University
    "The Supremacy of Love: The Advantages of a Love Centered Account of Virtue Ethics"
  • Rico Vitz, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Azusa Pacific University
    "Union, Mercy, and the Passions"

Spring 2016

  • Wyndy Corbin Reuschling, Professor of Ethics and Theology, Ashland Theological Seminary
    "Women and the Meaning of Love"
  • Moyer Hubbard, Professor of New Testament Language and Literature, Talbot School of Theology
    "Paul, the Stoics, and Love"
  • George Hunsinger, Hazel Thompson McCord Professor of Systematic Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary
    "After Nygren: Agape and Eros Reconsidered"
  • D. Stephen Long, Professor of Systematic Theology, Marquette University
    "Love Your Enemy? Neo-Anabaptist and Neo-Augustinian Approaches"
  • Aurora Matzke, Assistant Professor of English, Biola University
    "Participating in Love: How to Engage the Wise Crowd"
  • Eric Silverman, Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies, Christopher Newport University
    "The Supremacy of Love: The Advantages of a Love Centered Account of Virtue Ethics"
  • Charles Trimm, Assistant Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies, Talbot School of Theology
    “'O God, Break the Teeth in Their Mouth!': The Imprecatory Psalms and Enemy Love"
  • Allen Yeh, Associate Professor of Intercultural Studies & Missiology, Biola University 
    "Friendship & the Meaning of Love"

Pastor-in-Residence Fellowships

Fall 2015

  • Nick Bogardus, Lead Pastor, Cross of Christ Church, Costa Mesa, CA
    "Love and Judgment"

Spring 2016

  • Steve Choi, Lead Pastor, Crossway Church, Brea, CA
    "Loving Your Neighbor"

Course Development Grants

  • Jeannine K. Brown, New Testament, Bethel Seminary, "Enemy Love and Solidarity with the Marginalized: An Interdisciplinary Conversation with Matthew’s Gospel"
    ‚ÄčMany of the New Testament writings highlight love within the messianic community as an essential and central value. Matthew’s Gospel presses beyond this internal love ethic to exhort Jesus’ followers toward love of enemy and solidarity with the “least of these.” This course is intended to offer seminary students an interdisciplinary learning experience around the topic of love derived from Matthew’s Gospel. Students in the course will exploreMatthew’s exhortations to love broadly and deeply and will consider theological, ethical, psychological, and leadership dimensions of this framing of love. Over seven modules (consisting of two-­week increments), seven guest experts will participate in an interdisciplinary conversation with the faculty member and students focused around and stemming from Matthew’s love ethic. Distance-friendly technologies for guest contributors (e.g., Skype, Adobe Connect) will be utilized to prepare the course for a second offering in a hybrid distance format to reach a wider student population.
  • A. Sandra Willis, Psychology, Samford University, "The Meaning of Love: A Multidisciplinary Course"
    "The Meaning of Love" is an interdisciplinary psychology course designed to consider the big question, “What is Love?” Drawing from the expertise of faculty and professionals from multiple disciplines – psychology, theology, religion, philosophy, history, medicine & bioethics, and human development & family studies - we will study and compare definitions, concepts, theories, and research designed to understand, describe, and, especially, to encourage love and prosocial behavior. The course incorporates application and reflection on benevolent practices using individual and group writing assignments, service learning and field experiences, and group production of educational films.
Biola University
13800 Biola Ave. La Mirada, CA 90639
1-562-903-6000